I have spent the last 3 years  working with several groups of dancers, choreographers and actors on a research project to  archive the  gestures, movements and rhythms  of worship to understand their impact on our everyday lives. I think of myself as an activist archivist. I am designing an archive to polemically rearrange the standard perception of the world outside.  This project has provided the basis for several performances and exhibitions here and in Asia.


As a movement artist, I wanted to know how our movements are limited by centuries of worship. Building an archive was a place for me start. The reenactments, transformations, analysis and commentary that emanated from this exercise were what motivated it. 

View the full video here: https://vimeo.com/324808621 

Made with adult size turban, rope and cage.

Prayer forms 2018



With turbans and treated capati dough. 2018


Flag worship 2018

Flag hold


Treated capati dough on pole.


 'Teh Tarik and the Flag' at the National Visual Arts Gallery of Malaysia June 2018




Through this portraits, I wanted to give 50 participants a glimpse, through dance,  into the daily experiences of the Sikh man that has suffered widespread racial abuse for sporting external signifiers like beards and turbans.  As a movement artist, learning a dance dissolves boundaries and develops connections, not in any abstract way but because movement is universal.






 'Ex-Voto , the body + the institution' exhibition at the  Galway Arts Centre, Ireland from Jan to Mar 2018. Installation shots courtesy of GalwayArtsCentre.





































These abstract portraits are part  of my research into worship through a vocabulary of movements, from the perspective of the worshipers relationship with a bodily extension ( a prosthesis, in this case a turban) and consequently his god, prioritising his gestures and their historical weight in worship.













These abstract portraits are part  of my research into worship through a vocabulary of movements, from the perspective of the worshippers relationship with a bodily extension ( a prosthesis, in this case a turban) and consequently his god, prioritising his gestures and their historical weight in worship.



















These abstract portraits are part  of my research into worship  and mourning through a vocabulary of movements, from the perspective of the worshippers relationship with a bodily extension ( a prosthesis, in this case a turban) and consequently his god, prioritising his gestures and their historical weight in worship.